JeffNock
Jeff Nock Iowa

Jeff Nock’s 5 Tips on How to Scale a Rapidly Growing New Business

As small businesses enter key growth phases, they also encounter challenges: How does an organization properly scale to meet new demand, more customers, additional products, and expansion into new regions?

Jeff Nock ’s experience in market analysis and consulting for growing companies is particularly well-suited for businesses that have come across scaling surprises or new hurdles during expansion. For organizations in these situations, Jeff Nock Iowa consulting has a few words of advice on solutions and strategic preparation

Know What Funding is Right for Your Current Position

Expansion requires proper funding, and while a successful small business does bring in revenue, most of that tends to go right back into overhead and operations. For bigger growth phases, Jeff Nock advises companies to take a close look at what kind of funding is the right choice.

For example, a building expansion may be best matched with a business line of credit, while purchasing a new site would probably require a more conventional loan. Companies that want to launch brand new products should also think about crowdfunding, or exploring partnerships with other local businesses to help offset costs. There are many options, and Jeff Nock Iowa consulting services have seen businesses scale very well with a combination of funds from multiple sources.

Jeff Nock Suggests Looking Into Automation Early

Automation isn’t just for certain industries – every growing business can use it to effectively scale without getting overwhelmed. Jeff Nock Iowa tells businesses to consider automation in at least these areas:

  • Inventory: The right software can make tracking inventory a breeze – businesses should set up automatic alerts for re-ordering supplies and restocking shelves, which are easy to continue scaling throughout the life of the business. These are easily and effectively tied into POS systems.
  • Customer management: The sooner a business begins robust data collection for customers, the better. Customer profiles should synthesize purchase data, acquisition information, contact info, and other types of data into actionable information.
  • Marketing: Marketing automation can help schedule posts and provide automatic reports on SEO, campaign success ratios, and much more. Tap into a marketing automation platform early on, and your team will have no trouble scaling as demands become more complex.

Implement Robust Quality Control and Customer Guidelines

When businesses grow too quickly before they are ready, they tend to run into problems with quality and consistency. This happens with both physical products and the communication content that businesses produce. Jeff Nock says that companies must create quality control measures and guidelines to ensure that the right steps are followed to guarantee consistent, satisfying products. This is particularly important when onboarding new employees as the company expands.

Develop Customer Recruitment and Loyalty Programs

As a customer base grows, Jeff Nock reminds businesses that it’s important to set up your brand so that customers stay loyal – and act as ambassadors. Develop programs to encourage customers to share with friends, post online, and receive loyalty-based rewards. The earlier businesses do this, the more prepared they will be to recruit new customers, grow their online presence, and maintain a brand that is known for its quality customer service.

Be Ready to Move Onto a Fulfillment Service

For companies that provide any kind of physical product, Jeff Nock says that it’s vital to consider fulfillment services as the business grows. This is a key area where companies have growing pains – when their in-house shipment operation is no longer enough to ship to customers in a timely way without errors. When companies start to struggle with shipping, it’s time to contact a third-party fulfillment center and talk about inventory storage, shipping options, kitting, and cost-effective shipping choices. Jeff Nock also advises organizations to make sure that fulfillment services are compatible with online e-commerce platforms for easy data transfer and updates.

To learn more or ask Jeff more specific questions about your business situation, contact his consulting business, Prescient Consulting.

Jeff Nock

Jeff Nock Founder of Prescient Consulting

Jeff Nock is an experienced executive, consultant, and leader with a demonstrated history of growing startups, non-profits, and established companies. Jeff Nock is skilled in Business Planning, Strategic Planning Process, Management Development, Comprehensive Marketing, Sales, and Presentation Development. Strong, well-rounded background with a Master of Science in Management. Jeff has helped over 250 companies build and execute successful strategies and business plans.

He is the CEO & Founder of Prescient Consulting, LLC. Prescient is a consultancy that helps funded early-stage and mid-cap companies achieve their vision and growth goals by offering services that include C-Level mentoring, strategic planning, business planning, business model ideation/evolution, market analysis, competitive niche analysis, business development, operational efficiencies, and brand evolution. Prescient Consulting has also developed a stellar group of partners in areas such as software development and leadership development to ensure that services offered can scale with your business.

Jeff Nock has over 30 years of executive leadership experience including President & CEO of Goodwill of the Heartland, CEO of EPX Denver, AVP of Marketing and Product Development at ACT, and supervisor of a software coding department at a Dun & Bradstreet subsidiary. Jeff also has been part of three high tech startups including netLibrary, an online ebook library purchased by OCLC in Boulder, CO, Knowledge Analysis Technologies, an automated essay scoring engine purchased by Pearson in Boulder, CO, and ConnectFive, a UX design firm in Coralville, IA.

Jeff Nock is blessed with four amazing children and loves supporting his kids at all their events, fitness, reading, watching sports, and giving back to the community.

Where did the idea for Prescient Consulting come from?

For many years during my various leadership roles within organizations, I had the opportunity to be a volunteer mentor for a variety of business owners and their teams. During the Cedar Rapids flood of 2008, when the entire downtown was underwater and hundreds of businesses had to start over again, I volunteered through their Chamber of Commerce SCORE program as a business mentor and enjoyed helping people get back on their feet. I often was told that “you should do this full-time so at the end of 2018 I decided to go for it and launched Prescient Consulting, LLC.

What does your typical day look like and how do you make it productive?

Both pre-COVID 19 and now, in the mornings I am on ZOOM video calls with international clients and partners and do prospecting. In the afternoons, I spend time with local clients at their facilities. The key is to mix up the online remote work with the in-person client work as the online remote work is efficient but the in-person work allows for more socialization and the ability to develop deeper business relationships.

How do you bring ideas to life?

As a business owner, an executive for a company, or consultant, my forte has always been to work with the creative team available to identify opportunities for incremental improvement or to solve problems in the market/customer base. As Elon Musk is known for saying, companies can’t just come up with products or services that are as good or just a little bit better than those already in the market. They have to come up with products or services that clearly differentiate with value propositions that are clearly, incrementally better than available today. Google didn’t invent the search engine. They just made it faster and better than anyone else. Apple didn’t invent the smartphone, they just made theirs incrementally easier to use than anyone else.

What’s one trend that excites you?

As horrible as COVID 19 has been for the world, it has allowed the vast majority of workers and students to realize that working remotely is possible and that it can be more productive. While socialization at the workplace does enable strong collaboration, approximately 50% of people or more introverted than extroverted. Many of them may actually enjoy working remotely AND be more productive in doing so. As we work through this pandemic, I anticipate a trend where many people continue to work from home because they enjoy doing that more and are betters workers doing so.

What is one habit of yours that makes you more productive as an entrepreneur?

The ability to stay focused. Most entrepreneurs I work with are so creative and they are constantly coming up with new ideas. They often fail to focus long enough on one promising concept in order to bring that concept to fruition. As they say, dreamers come up with lots of ideas. Entrepreneurs execute on their ideas and make them realities.

What advice would you give your younger self?

Strive to surround yourself with people who are smarter than you. Good leaders should want the strongest possible team around themselves. The best companies have the best and strongest leadership teams (not just a great founder). When Steve Jobs was first at Apple he thought he should make all the decisions and was rude to his leadership team and employees. Eventually, his own Board of Directors fired him. When he came back after learning some humility he hired some of the brightest minds in tech history to be on his leadership team. This re-energized Apple, which became the most valuable company in the world.

Tell us something that’s true that almost nobody agrees with you on.

The University of Colorado, Boulder is the greatest university in the world!

As an entrepreneur, what is the one thing you do over and over and recommend everyone else do?

Get a mentor who has already done what you want to do and can meet with you regularly to help you achieve your goals. AND, mentor someone who wants to accomplish what you have already accomplished.

What is one strategy that has helped you grow your business?

Network, network, network. Defined as keep in touch with people and what they are trying to achieve and help them achieve their goals whenever you can. And don’t ask them for anything in return. Networking is not asking someone to help you. You end up growing your network, which grows your intellectual capital. And eventually, people reach out to help you with your goals and you don’t even have to ask.

What is one failure you had as an entrepreneur, and how did you overcome it?

I was part of a small startup team in 1998 at the beginning of the Dot Com boom. We raised and spent a lot of money fast on a model that was years ahead of its time. When the bubble burst in 2002 we lost everything. What I learned from that is you have to be confident but humble when launching a company. The ability to raise and spend money has to be balanced by appropriate market acceptance of the product or service (meaning the company should have revenue growth worthy of investment at various levels of growth).

What is one business idea that you’re willing to give away to our readers?

If I had a universal idea for a business, I would have already started that business! Each person has their own life experience. What consumer or business product or service simply doesn’t work currently? How could it be done incrementally better?

What is the best $100 you recently spent? What and why?

I run 6x a week and sometimes I forget how important running shoes are to a runner. I recently spent $100 on a new pair of Nike running shoes that conform to your soul after use. The difference in comfort has been amazing.

What is one piece of software or a web service that helps you be productive?

We have been using ZOOM for our business to connect with clients and partners all over the world for years. One of the few benefits of this horrible pandemic is that now all my clients and family and friends know how to use ZOOM to communicate.

What is the one book that you recommend our community should read and why?

“Start with Why” by Simon Sinek. The development of good company culture should start with why the company exists. If the reason the company exists is only to make money, that company will fail compared to those companies that have a purpose or why that is higher up Maslow’s hierarchy.

What is your favorite quote?

Having been on many non-profit boards and having been a CEO or executive for two large non-profits, I once worked at ACT and the CEO at the time, Dick Ferguson, used to say “We are non-profit. That doesn’t mean we are for the loss.” He meant no money, no mission.

Key Learnings:

  • Mentoring: Successful business people have earned that success through experience and effort and have a responsibility to share what they have learned with the next generation of leaders. It is important to not just take but to give.
  • Remote work is here to stay: The traditional in-person, group work setting works well for half of our world, but working remotely works better for many (introverts) and should and will continue to be an option that will increase productivity and worker morale.
  • Perseverance: So often in today’s world of instant gratification, we expect instant results. Success in the business world is rarely instantaneous but rather takes perseverance, hard work, and patience.
Jeff Nock

Jeff Nock, Iowa based Executive Consultant and CEO, Discusses Leadership Teams and Managing Mentor Programs

Prescient Consulting, owned by Iowa City’s Jeff Nock, is a planning and growth consulting company that has helped many companies and startups achieve their goals. One thing that Nock has noticed is that many businesses are eager to grow, but their leadership teams aren’t always ready to grow alongside the company. He has some important advice for leadership development that is relevant for all phases of company growth.

Preparing Leadership for Scaling Up

Experienced business leaders know that when a business changes, its leadership needs to evolve. This can be difficult for businesses of all sizes but particularly smaller businesses and new ventures because they may not have experienced leadership at the new larger level and therefore may need coaching and mentoring to learn how to evolve with the company.

Jeff Nock of Iowa has found, as a leader and mentor/consultant to over 200 startups and small businesses, that when beginning to scale, knowing when to adjust your leadership style is difficult. If you adjust too quickly, the new structure can squash the entrepreneurial spirit that is key to ongoing growth and company culture. Wait too long and your team won’t have the structure it needs to take advantage of growth opportunities.

So, Jeff Nock asks, when is the right time to scale your company’s leadership? Often we see startups filled with self-starters who require little direction. These people get things done with incredible speed and freewheeling cowboy spirit.

But Entrepreneur.com shares from their contributors, this works for a while, but as companies grow, they evolve into needing more structure. This can be very hard for startup founders who thrive in these “cowboy” work environments. But there comes a time when company leaders need to in essence grow up and maintain the entrepreneurial company culture while also implementing processes that standardize the companies most common workflows. This allows more work to be completed, more efficiently. In essence, more consistent, high-quality work, less “winging it”.

As the business grows, the leadership structure needs to branch out and specialize. Even if your company still is wholly located in Iowa City, for example, at a certain point, there’s a need for separate departments, then district management, then a more complex system based on regional management and a central headquarters, and so on. Founders and CEOs can’t keep on taking on additional responsibilities themselves: Eventually, they have to hand off those responsibilities to a larger executive team. Company leaders who become more and more and more strategic and fewer doers and empower others to lead the day to day operations scale faster than companies whose founders stay mired in the day today. But what does that look like?

Jeff Nock has three key concepts that these leaders should understand and work on followed by much more detail on Mentorship Programs.

  1. Learn to lead managers.

One of the biggest transitions a founder will make is from leading individual contributors to leading other leaders or managers. It takes a different skill set and focus to effectively do this.

The most important parts of this transition are strategic planning and training. Be clear with your new managers about what their personal and team responsibilities are, how those responsibilities directly connect to the overall strategic plan, and how you expect the various responsibilities to be prioritized. Secondly, make sure they have the mentoring, learning resources, and support to become effective managers.

Provide a set of good videos/articles/content they can reference, as well as an assigned mentor they can call upon who’s outside of their direct org chart command. As the leader, you set the culture, meaning the morals and values of the company and how work will be done, but once your managers are off and running, let them make mistakes and develop their own leadership styles, rather than trying to impose your own. Everybody leads differently, and it depends on team dynamics and personal styles.

  1. Transition from presence to process.

When a startup is young, leaders have to be hands-on and physically present every day. Once a company scales, however, a leader’s physical and mental presence needs to transition to leading rather than doing. To focus on the future. One study (Entrepreneur.com) shows managers waste up to 80% of their time on things that have little to no impact on their companies’ long-term value — and micromanaging employees falls squarely into that category.

That is why it’s key to transition your leadership skills from presence to process. Do this by applying organizational processes that ensure clear communication — communication effectiveness is the clear differentiator amongst businesses that scale and those that don’t. It is a key component of successful leadership, especially when founders aren’t able to bump into everyone on a daily basis.

  1. Prepare to delegate or automate administrative duties.

As your team grows, so will your administrative burden. At some point, you’ll have to decide whether you’re going to continue handling all this administrative work yourself or if you want to delegate the repetitive/trainable tasks to others.

  • Tasks such as expense reports and payroll can be taken off your plate by delegating them to the department level.
  • Lead by trust and verify. Let others do the day to day things they are probably better at than you anyway and use online reporting and other tools to verify everything is going as planned.
  • Don’t micro-manage, trust, verify, and reward good work.

Creating Coaching and Mentorship Programs

Jeff Nock of Iowa reports that companies are increasingly investing in career mentorship for their leadership team to boost:

  • Growth
  • Employee retention
  • Diversity
  • Succession planning

Whether you’re a startup, a small Iowa company, or a fast-growing global workforce, Jeff Nock recommends offering a mentorship program as a leadership perk to fuel company growth and hire and retain great talent–because all your employees’ friends work at companies who are investing in their career growth. In addition, as companies grow, diversity becomes more and more important. From thought, experience, and geographical perspectives, great growing companies embrace people from all ethnic and strategic backgrounds.

According to Inc.com, whether you are located in Iowa or in a major tech hub, mentorship as a perk is the new La Croix–except that it’s a lot more meaningful and effective in breaking silos and building a productive workforce. That said most mentorship programs fail because of:

  • Poor program management
  • Lack of executive buy-in
  • Poor mentor-mentee matching
  • Lack of structure and resources for mentors and mentees to navigate their conversations.

Pulling from Inc.com and personal experience, Jeff Nock of Iowa offers five basic fundamentals to help you build a mentorship program that actually works.

  1. Start with “Why?”

The most important part of setting up a mentorship program is explaining to mentors why they as individuals will benefit from participating. For example, you can email all potential mentors (in this case they are outside the company) and share with them how valuable you feel their leadership knowledge is and that it would be truly rewarding to be able to help the next generation of leaders learn from their experience. Most successful people enjoy sharing their experiences with others. They also enjoy free meals and beverages so promising mentors get-togethers that offer such libations, as well as good networking, is also a draw. For mentees, they can get ongoing mentorship from a more experienced leader who has already accomplished what they want to accomplish.

In the end, yes the mentorship program is meant to help fuel company growth, but it also must be clear that the program will be enjoyable for the mentors and help each mentee with their career growth. To effectively communicate this to leaders, you need to establish your program goals first. Why do you want to develop leaders? If it is because your leadership team is weak then you have another problem. All leadership teams and all people can improve. It needs to be made clear that the company is in the process of going from one level to the next and the mentor program is intended to help all leaders achieve their own personal potential. No matter how much experience a person has, there is always someone who has more. And you as the leader need to set the tone by having a mentor as well.

  1. Match based on mentee/company goals

Jeff Nock recommends matching leaders based on both their goals and the company’s strategic goals. As each individual leader will want to productively spend their time in mentor sessions that are clearly benefiting their future and as the company will be monitoring traction made in the strategic plan, this mentor program strategy ensures that leaders show up with a sense of urgency and actually follow through otherwise the relationship will fizzle out. So, as a second layer, Jeff Nock of Iowa recommends taking into account logistical preferences for matching mentors with mentees. Some people are comfortable with online ZOOM meetings meaning their mentor can be located anywhere, others prefer to actually meet in person (so if the company is in Iowa City, for example, the mentor needs to live in the area). What has the mentor accomplished that both the mentee and the company will learn from? Consider the mentees’ preference for their preferences for being matched with a fellow person of color, parent, immigrant, etc.

  1. Equip them with conversation topics

According to Inc.com, most mentees don’t know how to navigate these conversations. Often, mentors don’t know how to build momentum and give guidance. Jeff Nock of Iowa recommends a brief 30-minute training video be shared with all mentees at the launch of the program to go over the basics of mentorship and what’s expected of both mentors and mentees. After you make the matches, you can send them a document suggesting conversation topics for the first three meetings.

  1. Train them to follow through

The thing that bothers mentors the most is when mentees don’t follow-through on what they agree to do between meetings. It’s extremely important that mentees understand the importance of respecting the mentors’ time and to do what they say they are going to do. Mentees must focus on driving the relationship (that means sending follow up thank-you notes, scheduling the next meeting, sending their agenda before the meeting, and so on) and hold mentors accountable to treat mentorship meetings as they would treat an important work meeting.

  1. Celebrate success stories

Finally, celebrate success stories! Something as small as giving a shoutout to impactful mentors at your company all-hands meeting or hosting a luncheon for the mentors and mentees to network with the entire cohort will go a long way.

In summary, Jeff Nock of Iowa explains companies that want to scale need to make sure their leadership team scales first. The best way to do that is to establish new work processes that standardize consistent, high-quality outputs and let leaders spend more time leading and less time doing. In addition, every leader benefits from a strong mentor. Someone who has already done what the leader wants to do. We all need to reserve the right to get smarter and good leadership development helps both the company and the leader get smarter and better!

Jeff Nock

Jeff Nock, Iowa based Executive Consultant Explores Specific Key Concepts of Strategic Planning

Jeff Nock Outlines Key Concepts of Strategic Planning

 Jeff Nock, Iowa based Executive Consultant and CEO and Founder of Prescient Consulting, LLC, further explores certain key elements of strategic planning. Specifically, he explains that the effectiveness of the strategic planning process goes beyond setting forth the business’s vision for success and sustainability or communicating its purpose and value to customers, employees, and partners in a clear, concise manner.

The Jeff Nock Iowa business and executive consultancy firm works with a variety of companies. Founders in the startup space to leaders of established small and mid-cap companies lean on Jeff Nock Iowa based consultancy for advice and coaching assistance to excel and differentiate in their industry. An important step to unlocking long-term success is through the strategic planning process.

Strategic planning is pivotal to the long-term success of your company. Too many companies “wing it” day to day and may have short term success but ultimately they don’t realize their potential because they didn’t take the time to think about what that potential could be and how they can execute to achieve that potential. A good strategic plan is a living, dynamic process which projects the actions required to achieve potential. Understanding the important strategies and tactics of this plan and how to execute and measure success along the way provide a successful blueprint for any company.

You create a plan that captures the strategies that each area of your company will execute over prescribed periods of time (often quarterly-annual). Once these strategies are defined and assigned as lead responsibility to one leader per strategy, each strategy must define one or more Key Performance Indicators (KPIs). These KPIs will be measured in real-time or weekly whenever possible or monthly if necessary. For example, Sales could have a monthly KPI of $100,000 in revenue. For a mature organization that would be $25,000 per week. For a newer faster-growing company it might be $22,000 in week 1, $24,000 in week 2, $26,000 in week 3, and $28,000 in week 4.

Jeff Nock Iowa consultant explains the importance of planning and the important elements of your strategic plan

A saying of the Jeff Nock Iowa executive and business consultant company is that businesses who fail to plan, fail to know if they have succeeded. Moreover, plans that are written but never executed waste valuable time and resources. All this is to say that a strategic planning process for your business is an important first step. But the execution of that plan is more important.

Your plan is more than a collection of words on a piece of paper. They are the culmination of evaluating your internal core competencies, reading the market, identifying your niche, developing strategies to leverage those core competencies, and executing on those strategies within your focused niche.

The important aspects of your company’s strategic plan are:

  • Vision statement – This statement identifies what impact your company would have in a perfect world. Using Goodwill as an example, the vision of Goodwill is that all people with barriers to independence would have overcome those barriers and be living an abundant life.
  • Mission statement – Since we don’t live in a perfect world, companies are not able to achieve their vision, so a Mission Statement is what they do to add value and for who. Using Goodwill as an example again, Goodwill’s mission is to advance the well-being of people who experience barriers to independence.

To summarize using the Goodwill examples, many people are born with disabilities or have accidents that cause disabilities or experience other life challenges that cause them not to be able to maintain employment or basic social lives. The Goodwill vision is that all these people will overcome these issues and live great lives. The reality is that some disabilities can not be eliminated, so the vision will never be achieved. But the mission of advancing the well-being of these people is a clear beacon that enables all employees and stakeholders to stay focused on why they do the work they do and for who.

  • Culture Statement – a statement of shared beliefs and modes of behavior that define your workplace culture. People are motivated intrinsically and one of the top reasons that people excel and enjoy working with companies is because they align with and are motivated by the culture they work in. Culture statements should not be cliché statements like “work hard and earn profits.” Founders, owners, and CEOs should set the mark for the environment they want to or have established and ensured that people who are hired fit within that culture.
  • SWOT analysis – an important element of the strategic plan, a SWOT takes a look at your company’s strengths-weaknesses (internal), and opportunities and threats (external). This can then be used to clarify core competencies so strategies can be identified to leverage those core competencies, a weakness which can be shored up, partnerships that can increase market share or address weaknesses, and competitive factors that can affect strategies like pricing and market locations.
  • Strategies These are the major company-initiatives that are the most important projects to complete during the prescribed timeframes within the plan. Each strategy must have one person accountable for leading the charge. The strategies must align with the company mission.
  • Tactics (with key performance indicators or KPIs) – For each strategy, three or so tactics must be identified (similar to project planning) that will be executed to achieve the defined strategy.

Jeff Nock Iowa consultant on strategy setting

A strategy setting is an essential element for achieving a company’s potential. Companies who know what their mission is and take the time to think through what the most important strategies are to accomplish that mission are proven to be more successful than companies that merely work hard to achieve the opportunities that come up. One strategy setting methodology begins with a broad statement that uses bold words such as “enhance” or “empower.” From these broad statements come enumerated objectives (i.e. Strategy 1, Tactics 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, etc.) which break down specific measures for meeting the goal.

This drill-down approach is important as it allows you to focus aspects of the strategy to the departments(s) accountable for achieving that strategy. For example, Jeff Nock Iowa leadership consultant explains a strategy such as “empowering patients to improve their healthcare outcomes” for a small medical practice could involve tactics such as:

  1. – Improve technology interface for patients for scheduling and accessing/updating medical records.
  2. – Increase availability and access for patients 24/7.
  3. – Waive fees associated with initial consultations and overhaul fee schedule for certain diagnostic tests to further reduce barriers to access.

You can see that within these three tactics related to Strategy #1 (“empowering patients to improve their healthcare outcomes”), the practice has drilled down enough to involve elements of its administrative staff, finance, and medical staff. This means responsibility has been assigned where appropriate.

Strategies are important aspects of the strategic plan. It is equally important to create meaningful tactics that relate best to the strategies you outline in the plan. With these tactics, you must create measurable KPIs that are sensible and best indicate progress toward the completion of a strategy and objective. In the example above, for tactic 1, a KPI could show a month-to-month positive change in the number of patient logins to access their personal health records over a period of 3 or 6 months. KPIs do not have to be complicated, just a SMART (Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Relevant, and Time-bound) metric useful in validating results.

Ongoing plan leadership according to Jeff Nock Iowa based business coaching CEO is essential

So often companies put months of time and energy into strategic planning, have a big launch party…and then go back to the same day to day activity. Nothing changes and strategies are not accomplished and potential mission fulfillment is not seen. A key to the successful execution of a leadership plan is a day to day leader within the company who is ultimately responsible for the completion of the plan. That person can either be the CEO or a COO type. This person must be both detail-oriented and a motivator of people. As many founders and CEOs are visionary sales types and are more valuable in the market with customers or thinking ahead on upcoming strategies, sometimes the COO or Operations Director takes the point on strategic plan execution.

Ongoing communication is imperative in order to execute a good strategic plan. The plan leader should meet in regular intervals (weekly or monthly) to review KPI performance, celebrate success, address challenges, and iteratively adjust action where necessary. Department heads must then meet with each of their teams and make sure that each person in the company is completing work that is connected to the strategies and tactics of the overall plan. Each person must feel connected to the plan and feel they are making a contribution in order for the company to achieve its ultimate potential.

Another aspect of plan leadership for work teams is internal and external feedback. As defined by Jeff Nock Iowa based CEO for business advancement, feedback is the opportunity for customers and employees to send and receive positive (and critical) feedback from peers, supervisors, and others necessary to evaluate and improve performance. An example of how to gather customer feedback would be the Net Promoter Score (NPS). NPS is a third-party evaluation tool that allows customers to give their vendors feedback. Companies can then compare their score vs industry norms and celebrate or adjust accordingly.

Internal feedback can be conducted at the end of each project or time period. The 360 personnel review has been used for annual employee reviews but now more and more companies are taking the time to do a project review or quarterly review of their teams and the teams they work with. Done within a healthy culture (constructive feedback versus critical feedback) can result in great ongoing continuous improvement.

The integration of customer feedback with internal team communication benefits in the elimination of built-up frustration and enables the continuance of processes that are working and the adjustment of those that are not.

Setting mission-focused strategies, thinking through and assigning SMART tactics that will enable those strategies to be achieved, and creating ongoing customer and internal team feedback results in the successful execution of well thought out strategic plans. This allows companies to work within a culture they enjoy, to achieve their potential, make their biggest impact on the world possible, and enable each employee to feel valued as contributors to the overall success of the company.

Jeff Nock

Jeff Nock, CEO & Founder Of Prescient Consulting, LLC, Helps Funded Early-Stage, Mid-Cap Companies Achieve Their Vision, Growth Goals With Innovative, Strategic Leadership Practices

Jeff Nock, the chief executive officer and founder of Prescient Consulting, LLC, an Iowa City-based consulting firm, has proved a pioneer and visionary in helping early-stage and mid-cap companies development in business…
Friday, March 6th 2020, 6:58 PM EST

Jeff Nock, the chief executive officer and founder of Prescient Consulting, LLC, an Iowa City-based consulting firm, has proved a pioneer and visionary in helping early-stage and mid-cap companies development in business through innovative leadership practices.

Prescient Consulting, LLC has become an industry leader for the cutting-edge services it offers, which include C-Level mentoring, strategic planning, business planning, business model ideation and evolution, market analysis, competitive niche analysis, business development, and operational efficiency and brand evolution. Each service undertakes a comprehensive business approach to set teams and companies apart from the rest so they can achieve their growth goals.

Jeff Nock, a leading business consultant in eastern Iowa, relies on years of professional experience in the fields of strategic planning, new product development, sales, marketing, and corporate leadership to support a range of corporate entities, including innovative industry-disrupting startups to well-established regional or national organizations. Expanding on record-breaking growth in 2019, Jeff Nock and Prescient Consulting, LLC are committed to continuing to help scale businesses, develop competent leadership teams, and execute strategic consulting strategies for companies, their clients, and their stakeholders.

Jeff Nock and Prescient Consulting, LLC provide strategic, customized approaches to fit a client’s unique business needs. Considering a company’s growth rate, clientele, and internal operating structure and culture, Prescient Consulting, LLC embraces leadership styles and trends that can evolve to promote the best results for organizations.

Committed to passionately developing leadership team development plans, both for existing and new company leaders, Jeff Nock has a rare ability to reach from the ground to the boardroom. Providing effective team development services, Prescient Consulting, LLC ensures a smooth road to success. With ranging expertise in a variety of corporate areas, Jeff Nock has written popular blog posts on several pertinent business topics, including how to get the right people in the right seats of a company, how to develop operating systems to scale a business, help to improve concepts and growth for social entrepreneurship, and how to model business development, channel strategy, and develop partnerships in the digital age.

In every instance, Jeff relies on years of professional experience as a successful, accomplished executive to support over 250 early-stage and mid-cap companies, each of which he helps to build and execute successful strategies and business plans. Helping clients to see their company’s future growth more clearly, Jeff is also instrumental in improving search engine rankings and standings and in reshaping digital images. Such successes have regularly proven Prescient Consulting, LLC to be a preeminent consultancy firm in Iowa City and surrounding communities.

Before founding Prescient Consulting, LLC, Jeff Nock was an Entrepreneur in Residence/Lecturer at the University John Pappajohn Entrepreneurial Center, where he helped to lead and develop student ventures, create exponential growth for the university’s business incubator, and guide mentorship, marketing, funding, and networking initiatives. Jeff was a robust leader throughout the local Iowa City community, serving as Treasurer on the Board of Directors of Cubfoot Solutions, as Strategic Planning, Business Development, and Marketing Lead at ConnectFive, as President and CEO of Goodwill of the Heartland, and as Assistant Vice-President of Marketing and Product Development – Education Division at ACT.

To learn more about Prescient Consulting, LLC, please visit Prescient.us.

About Jeff Nock

A graduate of Regis University in Denver, Colorado with a Master of Science in Management, Jeff Nock is the founder and CEO of Prescient Consulting, LLC, based in Iowa City, Iowa. Renowned for helping early-stage and mid-cap companies to achieve their visions and growth goals, Jeff Nock and his stellar group of partners have, together, now assisted more than 250 companies in building and executing successful strategic and business plans. Jeff, a Christian blessed with four amazing children, loves supporting his kids and avidly pursues fitness, reading, sports, and community philanthropy.

To learn more about Jeff Nock, connect with him on LinkedIn or at JeffNock.com.

Jeff Nock Provides Cash Flow Management Advice During a Company’s Startup Years

Jeff Nock, a leadership and business development consultant, offers five tips.

IOWA CITY, IA / ACCESSWIRE / March 24, 2020 / Jeff Nock is an internationally recognized executive and consultant with expertise in developing startups, small and mid-cap companies, and nonprofit organizations. His expertise has helped many companies create cash flow management plans and initiatives. As someone who has accumulated experience developing and implementing cash flow management plans for various types of companies, Jeff Nock offers an essential set of practical tips for companies that are just starting out.

Jeff Nock states that "When new businesses are launching, it’s an exciting time, and everyone involved is geared to succeed and make their mark on the world, but during these ramp-up months and first few years, it’s important not only to focus on revenue growth but also cash flow management. Not always an easy task, it’s essential to have a plan and to stick to that plan." Key components of a cash flow management plan and a revenue growth plan involve calculating the burn rate, runway, cash flow positive, and profitability point for the business, tracking and evaluating cash inflows and outflows, bringing the financial experts on board, hiring the right staff with the right skills, and leveraging technology.

Jeff Nock‘s First Tip for Cash Flow Management: Calculate the Burn Rate, Runway, Cash Flow Positive, and Profitability Points

As leaders and founders of startups can be focused on the overall vision of the company and initial revenue generation, it is important to not forget about key financial projections and then track actual versus projection. In addition to having a close eye on revenue, it is important to monitor the monthly burn rate. As startups spend or "burn" more money than they bring in, the monthly burn rate is revenue minus expense. So, if revenue is $1,000 for a month and expenses are $10,000 then the monthly burn rate is $9,000.

A startups runway is the amount of time they have under current projections before they run out of money. If a company has $1,000,000 in cash and a monthly burn rate of $100,000 then their runway is 10 months.

Many startups confuse cash flow positive with profitability. Cash flow positive is when a company is no longer burning cash on a monthly basis, but rather breaking even or generating a monthly profit. Companies don’t become profitable until they have generated enough positive cash flow to pay off any initial debt (from owners or investors).

Calculating these important financial projections is important as companies look at long term investment and are financial projections that potential investors use to determine whether a business is viable and worthy of investment. Once these projections are in place, startup business owners should track the progress towards the projections and make strategic business decisions to grow revenue and manage expenses accordingly. If revenue is slightly ahead of projections and expenses are on forecast then the business owner can decide to either save that excess cash or reinvest to spur faster revenue growth.

For investors (whether the owner, friends and family, angel or VC), these financials, combined with the strength of the business model and leadership team enable data from which to evaluate business viability. If a startup has a $100,000 in startup capital, a burn rate of $10,000 a month and has a plan to triple revenue with an influx of an additional $100,000 in funding, the investor can make an educated decision on whether to invest. If the startup has $100,000 and a monthly burn rate of $50,000 it may be too late for that company without a drastic reduction in expenses or a sizable new source of revenue that is imminent.

Jeff Nock‘s Second Tip: Review and Evaluate Cash Flows

Reviewing and evaluating cash flows starts with tracking expenses and revenues. While this seems basic, there are sophisticated cloud platforms and software applications that can help automate whether revenue and cost management techniques are being leveraged. While most startups are focused on living day to day and month to month, it is still important for mentors and investors/potential investors to see logically created financial projections. Software like PlanGuru can provide analytical budgeting tools, which can help startups make more accurate financial projections for up to ten years. Many of these applications also offer training packages to help business owners learn the capabilities of the applications and available forecasting tools.

Having forecasting tools can help startups that do not have an established history get a better handle on ways to optimize expenses and revenues. A lack of an established history of cost/revenue trends is one of the reasons why it is critical to frequently review cost and revenue data once it starts coming in. Adjustments to production, price points, and fixed and/or variable costs may need to be made quickly. As a best practice, Jeff Nock recommends startups begin by reviewing costs and revenues weekly and then back off to a monthly basis.

Jeff Nock‘s Third Tip: Call in the Experts

Startup founders have quite a bit on their plates and different hats to wear when getting a new business off the ground. It can be overwhelming to have to handle strategic management, human resources, and hiring/retention, technical infrastructures, and financial management. Even if the founders and leaders of a new business have training or experience in financial management, it is best to utilize mentors and when possible bring external consultants and experts on board.

Bringing in external financial experience is crucial as a startup business owner is too close to their business to have an objective perspective. As Nock advises, "many early-stage startups outsource the finance role to certified public accountants who can come in a few hours a week and handle accounting and cash flow management." Outsourcing the financials and cash flow management provides startup leaders with more time to focus on growing the business.

Selection criteria for a certified public accountant or financial consultant should consist of criteria like experience, recommendations, availability, services, and goal alignment as well as affordability. Examine what type of experience an accountant or consultant has with other successful startups and determine whether that person’s experience is similar to the startup’s industry, product or service line, and organizational form or type. Ask whether the person’s work ethic and philosophy match the organization’s culture. Review testimonials from current and former clients and ask for references.

Jeff Nock‘s Fourth Tip: Hire Financial Help at the Right Time

While most early stage startups can’t afford to hire a full-time accountant right away and use external accountants for a few hours a week, eventually, as the company grows, the amount of accounting will also grow. As outside accountants will usually charge more per hour than in house accounts cost (not including benefit), it is important to realize when the outside consulting work has reached the point where it can be replaced by hiring an accountant. This can be done part-time at first and eventually ramped up to full-time.

When considering this initial hire, make sure to invest in not only the individual’s expertise but their fit with the company’s culture. Often, whether it is a financial person or any other role, people in general do not understand the need for adaptability when working with startups. This isn’t to say that anything should be done outside of accounting rules or laws by any means. It just means that it is quite different working as an accountant for a Fortune 500 company than it is working for a startup and some people just don’t have the ability or desire to work in such a fluid environment.

Since startup cultures are drastically different from established companies, those with startup experience will be used to working in an environment with a lot of uncertainty and little direction or supervision. A startup often requires working at a fast pace, the ability to grasp new concepts and responsibilities quickly, and the ability to see what needs to be done and the willingness to do it, even if it is not part of the person’s job description.

Jeff Nock‘s Fifth Tip: Leverage Technology

Leveraging technology involves looking at what financial technical resources will help the startup grow and what resources will help the startup optimize operations, both internal and external. Thinking beyond physical hardware and software applications, startup leaders should consider how technology will be used and leveraged. Cybersecurity risks are prevalent today and financial data, just as customer data, must be kept secure, especially when investors are involved. Establishing procedures for secure financial data storage to customer relationship management, these secure procedures and strategies should guide the purchase of financial technology-related resources.

While many startups use Excel spreadsheets and other rudimentary tools, it is important to quickly migrate to a secure cloud-based platform like Quickbooks. By using such a third-party platform that is focused on maintaining data security and constantly upgrading features, business owners can securely input and access accounting data 24×7 wherever they can access the Internet.

With more than 30.7 million small businesses and startups in the United States as of 2019, cash flow and revenue management is an important key to long-term sustainability. Approximately only 20 percent of small businesses are still in existence after five years. Ensuring the business idea and strategy is viable and sustainable in the long-term can be more easily accomplished by implementing Nock’s tips.

Jeffrey Nock‘s experience includes being the CEO of multiple companies, part of multiple successful startups and as CEO and Founder of Prescient Consulting, LLC. His company has helped over 200 companies that are in the early stage of development, as well as mid-cap companies. As an experienced consultant, Nock strives to assist organizations with achieving visions and growth objectives through services such as mentoring for the C-Suite, strategic and financial planning, business planning, business model ideation and evolution, competitive niche analysis, business development, operational efficiencies, and brand evolution.

Nock‘s repertoire also includes growing startups, growing nonprofit organizations, and helping established companies achieve new growth targets. His skills include leadership development, strategic planning, business development, financial oversight, and presentation development. Outside the consulting world, he enjoys spending time with his four children, supporting his children’s events, participating in physical fitness activities, reading, watching sports, and finding ways to give back to his community.

Jeff Nock Provides Cash Flow Management Advice During a Company’s Startup Years

Jeff Nock, a leadership and business development consultant, offers five tips.

IOWA CITY, IA / ACCESSWIRE / March 24, 2020 / Jeff Nock is an internationally recognized executive and consultant with expertise in developing startups, small and mid-cap companies, and nonprofit organizations. His expertise has helped many companies create cash flow management plans and initiatives. As someone who has accumulated experience developing and implementing cash flow management plans for various types of companies, Jeff Nock offers an essential set of practical tips for companies that are just starting out.

Jeff Nock states that "When new businesses are launching, it’s an exciting time, and everyone involved is geared to succeed and make their mark on the world, but during these ramp-up months and first few years, it’s important not only to focus on revenue growth but also cash flow management. Not always an easy task, it’s essential to have a plan and to stick to that plan." Key components of a cash flow management plan and a revenue growth plan involve calculating the burn rate, runway, cash flow positive, and profitability point for the business, tracking and evaluating cash inflows and outflows, bringing the financial experts on board, hiring the right staff with the right skills, and leveraging technology.

Jeff Nock‘s First Tip for Cash Flow Management: Calculate the Burn Rate, Runway, Cash Flow Positive, and Profitability Points

As leaders and founders of startups can be focused on the overall vision of the company and initial revenue generation, it is important to not forget about key financial projections and then track actual versus projection. In addition to having a close eye on revenue, it is important to monitor the monthly burn rate. As startups spend or "burn" more money than they bring in, the monthly burn rate is revenue minus expense. So, if revenue is $1,000 for a month and expenses are $10,000 then the monthly burn rate is $9,000.

A startups runway is the amount of time they have under current projections before they run out of money. If a company has $1,000,000 in cash and a monthly burn rate of $100,000 then their runway is 10 months.

Many startups confuse cash flow positive with profitability. Cash flow positive is when a company is no longer burning cash on a monthly basis, but rather breaking even or generating a monthly profit. Companies don’t become profitable until they have generated enough positive cash flow to pay off any initial debt (from owners or investors).

Calculating these important financial projections is important as companies look at long term investment and are financial projections that potential investors use to determine whether a business is viable and worthy of investment. Once these projections are in place, startup business owners should track the progress towards the projections and make strategic business decisions to grow revenue and manage expenses accordingly. If revenue is slightly ahead of projections and expenses are on forecast then the business owner can decide to either save that excess cash or reinvest to spur faster revenue growth.

For investors (whether the owner, friends and family, angel or VC), these financials, combined with the strength of the business model and leadership team enable data from which to evaluate business viability. If a startup has a $100,000 in startup capital, a burn rate of $10,000 a month and has a plan to triple revenue with an influx of an additional $100,000 in funding, the investor can make an educated decision on whether to invest. If the startup has $100,000 and a monthly burn rate of $50,000 it may be too late for that company without a drastic reduction in expenses or a sizable new source of revenue that is imminent.

Jeff Nock‘s Second Tip: Review and Evaluate Cash Flows

Reviewing and evaluating cash flows starts with tracking expenses and revenues. While this seems basic, there are sophisticated cloud platforms and software applications that can help automate whether revenue and cost management techniques are being leveraged. While most startups are focused on living day to day and month to month, it is still important for mentors and investors/potential investors to see logically created financial projections. Software like PlanGuru can provide analytical budgeting tools, which can help startups make more accurate financial projections for up to ten years. Many of these applications also offer training packages to help business owners learn the capabilities of the applications and available forecasting tools.

Having forecasting tools can help startups that do not have an established history get a better handle on ways to optimize expenses and revenues. A lack of an established history of cost/revenue trends is one of the reasons why it is critical to frequently review cost and revenue data once it starts coming in. Adjustments to production, price points, and fixed and/or variable costs may need to be made quickly. As a best practice, Jeff Nock recommends startups begin by reviewing costs and revenues weekly and then back off to a monthly basis.

Jeff Nock‘s Third Tip: Call in the Experts

Startup founders have quite a bit on their plates and different hats to wear when getting a new business off the ground. It can be overwhelming to have to handle strategic management, human resources, and hiring/retention, technical infrastructures, and financial management. Even if the founders and leaders of a new business have training or experience in financial management, it is best to utilize mentors and when possible bring external consultants and experts on board.

Bringing in external financial experience is crucial as a startup business owner is too close to their business to have an objective perspective. As Nock advises, "many early-stage startups outsource the finance role to certified public accountants who can come in a few hours a week and handle accounting and cash flow management." Outsourcing the financials and cash flow management provides startup leaders with more time to focus on growing the business.

Selection criteria for a certified public accountant or financial consultant should consist of criteria like experience, recommendations, availability, services, and goal alignment as well as affordability. Examine what type of experience an accountant or consultant has with other successful startups and determine whether that person’s experience is similar to the startup’s industry, product or service line, and organizational form or type. Ask whether the person’s work ethic and philosophy match the organization’s culture. Review testimonials from current and former clients and ask for references.

Jeff Nock‘s Fourth Tip: Hire Financial Help at the Right Time

While most early stage startups can’t afford to hire a full-time accountant right away and use external accountants for a few hours a week, eventually, as the company grows, the amount of accounting will also grow. As outside accountants will usually charge more per hour than in house accounts cost (not including benefit), it is important to realize when the outside consulting work has reached the point where it can be replaced by hiring an accountant. This can be done part-time at first and eventually ramped up to full-time.

When considering this initial hire, make sure to invest in not only the individual’s expertise but their fit with the company’s culture. Often, whether it is a financial person or any other role, people in general do not understand the need for adaptability when working with startups. This isn’t to say that anything should be done outside of accounting rules or laws by any means. It just means that it is quite different working as an accountant for a Fortune 500 company than it is working for a startup and some people just don’t have the ability or desire to work in such a fluid environment.

Since startup cultures are drastically different from established companies, those with startup experience will be used to working in an environment with a lot of uncertainty and little direction or supervision. A startup often requires working at a fast pace, the ability to grasp new concepts and responsibilities quickly, and the ability to see what needs to be done and the willingness to do it, even if it is not part of the person’s job description.

Jeff Nock‘s Fifth Tip: Leverage Technology

Leveraging technology involves looking at what financial technical resources will help the startup grow and what resources will help the startup optimize operations, both internal and external. Thinking beyond physical hardware and software applications, startup leaders should consider how technology will be used and leveraged. Cybersecurity risks are prevalent today and financial data, just as customer data, must be kept secure, especially when investors are involved. Establishing procedures for secure financial data storage to customer relationship management, these secure procedures and strategies should guide the purchase of financial technology-related resources.

While many startups use Excel spreadsheets and other rudimentary tools, it is important to quickly migrate to a secure cloud-based platform like Quickbooks. By using such a third-party platform that is focused on maintaining data security and constantly upgrading features, business owners can securely input and access accounting data 24×7 wherever they can access the Internet.

With more than 30.7 million small businesses and startups in the United States as of 2019, cash flow and revenue management is an important key to long-term sustainability. Approximately only 20 percent of small businesses are still in existence after five years. Ensuring the business idea and strategy is viable and sustainable in the long-term can be more easily accomplished by implementing Nock’s tips.

Jeffrey Nock‘s experience includes being the CEO of multiple companies, part of multiple successful startups and as CEO and Founder of Prescient Consulting, LLC. His company has helped over 200 companies that are in the early stage of development, as well as mid-cap companies. As an experienced consultant, Nock strives to assist organizations with achieving visions and growth objectives through services such as mentoring for the C-Suite, strategic and financial planning, business planning, business model ideation and evolution, competitive niche analysis, business development, operational efficiencies, and brand evolution.

Nock‘s repertoire also includes growing startups, growing nonprofit organizations, and helping established companies achieve new growth targets. His skills include leadership development, strategic planning, business development, financial oversight, and presentation development. Outside the consulting world, he enjoys spending time with his four children, supporting his children’s events, participating in physical fitness activities, reading, watching sports, and finding ways to give back to his community.

Jeff Nock

Jeff Nock demonstrates how to get the right people in the right seats of a company

Business consultant Jeff Nock, from Iowa City, Iowa, explains how to get the right people in the right seats at your company.

Getting the right people in the right seats is essential for the success of any company. That’s according to business consultant Jeff Nock, from Iowa City, Iowa, as he outlines a number of key ways to both attract and retain the best people, and to ensure that they’re in precisely the right seats for success.

Attracting the right people is Jeff Nock‘s first area of focus. “I often recommend that any company or organization should aim to boast at least five benefits tailored toward attracting the right people in the first instance,” says the business consultant and marketing expert, speaking from his office in Iowa City, Iowa.

Business owners are, he says, free to choose the five or more benefits which they see most fit. As a business consultant and expert in the field, however, Jeff Nock has, he believes, whittled down dozens of possible benefits to the five which he believes have the best potential in getting the right people in the right seats of a company. “These,” he reveals, “are culture, fair pay, recognition, variety, and rewards.”

“People want to be happy in their work,” Jeff Nock continues, “and from establishing a winning corporate culture to ensuring variety, fair pay, and recognition more generally, a truly rewarding working environment is, I believe, the best way to get the right people through the door.”

The secret, meanwhile, to ensuring that people are, and remain, in the right seats at your company is, according to Jeff Nock, also partly down to cementing in place effective processes, supported, wherever possible, by the appropriate tools, software, and other systems.

It’s essential, he says, that clear roles are defined if people’s skills are to be utilized as best as possible. “Define clear roles at all levels and match the appropriate skills to each of these,” suggests the Iowa-based business consultant.

“The correct structure and defined skills and roles will, then,” he adds, wrapping up, “allow a company’s systems and processes to, as a result, operate as effectively as possible, with just the right people in exactly the right seats at your business.”

Founder and CEO of Prescient Consulting, LLC, based in Iowa City, Iowa, Jeff Nock boasts a demonstrated history of growing nonprofit organizations, startups, and established companies alike. Skilled in business and strategic planning, branding, sales, and marketing, now-established Iowa resident Nock also holds a master’s degree in management from Colorado’s Regis University and is a specialist in management development. To learn more, visit https://prescient.us/.

Jeff Nock

Jeff Nock explains developing an operating system to help scale a business

Iowa City-based consultant Jeff Nock reveals the basics of developing an operating system to help scale a business that’s truly effective.

 Often companies that successfully launch hit a ceiling. This is because while the business model can be sound and customer base may embrace the product or service, the company can’t scale because their business doesn’t have a scalable operating system. That’s according to marketing and product development specialist Jeff Nock, a business consultant from Iowa City, Iowa, as he explains more about the process.

“In essence, companies can “wing it” in an entrepreneurial way and often get far due to hard work. But, eventually, there will be a need for more formal, documented processes that ensure that work is done in a prioritized and efficient manner,” suggests Jeff Nock, an Iowa City-based business consultant and marketing and product development specialist.

Beyond this, a business operating system should include a formalized method of using data to monitor success. There are a number of different scorecard methodologies that can be implemented to help companies know if what they are doing is working or needs adjustment. is what defines a company’s approach to everything from operations and going to market, to dealing with customers and clients, according to the expert. “It is proven that when companies pick the right metrics and consistently monitor those metrics, this enables teams to focus on making sure the results are positive. The emphasis on measurement is not intended to be punitive but rather a motivating reminder to excel in the prioritized areas,” Jeff Nock explains.

In addition to formalized processes and a scorecard, a business operating system should also include a personnel component that ensures that people who are added to the team not only have the skills to do their jobs successfully but also are compatible with the company’s culture. “Too often as company’s grow beyond a startup to a later stage company, they rush to hire and fill openings and end up bringing aboard people who don’t mesh with their culture. This inevitably affects the company negatively even to the extent of changing the company culture for the worse,” adds the expert.

Touching more deeply on personnel, Jeff Nock shared, “It’s essential to take the time to identify roles and responsibilities at a more specialized level. When companies first start, everyone is doing a little of everything. But as they scale, roles need to become more specialized organizational charts, without becoming overly bureaucratic, have to reflex these new, more defined roles,” suggests the Iowa-based business consultant, speaking from his office in Iowa City, Iowa.

Jeff Nock is the founder and CEO of Prescient Consulting, LLC, based in Iowa City, Iowa. Renowned for helping early-stage and mid-cap companies to achieve their visions and growth goals, Nock and his stellar group of partners have, together, now assisted more than 250 companies in building and executing successful strategic, business and annual operating plans. To find out more, visit https://prescient.us/

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Jeff Nock

Jeff Nock Wraps up Another Successful Year at Prescient Consulting, LLC

After another successful year for Jeff Nock and his partners at Prescient Consulting, LLC, the business consultant wraps up 2019 and looks forward to 2020 and beyond

Following another successful year for business consultant Jeff Nock and his firm, Prescient Consulting, LLC, the Regis University graduate and specialist in management development has this week thanked his clients and stellar group of partners for a fantastic 2019. Wrapping up the year in style, Nock revisits the last 12 months and looks forward to the New Year.

“This has been another fantastic year for myself and my partners at Prescient Consulting, LLC,” said business consultant Jeff Nock recently, “and I’d like to thank them, my wonderful clients, and my family for the last 12 months as we look forward to the holidays, New Year, and 2020 and beyond.”

Throughout 2019, Nock has generously and selflessly shared numerous behind the scenes looks at his work at Prescient Consulting, LLC, explaining leadership team development, delving into brand consulting strategies, highlighting the importance of partnership development, revealing how to create a channel strategy, and much more. “From sharing proven pricing strategy examples to helping to define successful business model development, I think it’s important,” says Nock, “to offer an insight into the worlds of strategic planning, branding, sales, and marketing for those who wish to learn more.”

The selfless business consultant has also offered proven tips on how best to scale a business while explaining the concept of social entrepreneurship, describing how to evolve a company’s brand, and revealing the value of conducting periodic SWOT analyses. “Sharing years of business plan development knowledge, I’ve enjoyed providing an insight into business at Prescient Consulting, LLC,” Nock explains, “and look forward to doing more of the same during 2020 and beyond.”

Other topics touched on by business consultant Jeff Nock this year include market analysis, how to develop a leadership team within an organization, the importance of evolving culture within a company, the benefits of leadership development for individual leaders, and how consultants can help companies with internal operational efficiencies.

He’s also spoken openly and at length on Christian leadership, business and startup mentoring, the importance of flexible focus for startups, and how to balance being a father and a CEO.

“It can be a challenge to designate enough time to both your family and work, but it’s not impossible,” said Nock at the time. “The key, I believe,” he adds, wrapping up, “is good communication and scheduling.”

A graduate of Regis University in Denver, Colorado, Jeff Nock is the founder and CEO of Prescient Consulting, LLC, based in Iowa City, Iowa. Renowned for helping early-stage and mid-cap companies to achieve their visions and growth goals, Nock and his stellar group of partners have, together, now assisted more than 250 companies in building and executing successful strategic and business plans. To find out more, visit https://prescient.us/.